New Term Extraction Features in InterpretBank and InterpretersHelp – Thumbs up!

Extracting terminology from preparatory texts into a term database seems to be the hot topic of the moment, judging by what the two most active and innovative CAI (computer-assisted interpreting) tools, InterpretBank and InterpretersHelp, are working on at the moment.  So while I am still waiting to become a Windows beta tester of Intragloss, the pioneer in this field, I am eager to have a go at both InterpretBank5’s (beta) and InterpretBank’s (experimental) new extraction features.

InterpretBank by Claudio Fantinuoli has been adding quite some time-saving features for conference preparation lately. Apart from searching online ressources on the go while building your glossary, it now promises to extract terminology from your glossaries, view original and translation in parallel and link documents to glossaries. This does indeed sound like Intragloss combined with the sophisticated booth-friendly terminology management system that InterpretBank has been for many years. So off we go!

As you can see in the picture, a new „documents“ icon has been added to the familiar three others (editing, conference mode, flashcards). When I press the magic button, the documents pane appears in the bottom left corner and lets me add documents like pdf or pptx in my two languages and display them next to each other. Unfortunately, there is no synchronised scrolling and no search function to look up word in the documents, but these functions are to be implemented soon. The selected documents are now linked to the glossary, so whenever this particular glossary is opened, they will appear in the documents pane. Highlighting words in the two texts and inserting them into the glossary or looking up translations in my favourite online resources (like IATE, Linguee, Pons, LEO and others more) works so swiftly, when I first tried it the terms were in my glossary before I had even noticed.

For English texts, context examples can be looked up using the right mouse button or using the icon in the list of extracted terms.  And what’s great for sharing with colleagues and for using in the booth: The text can be opened in a separate window and annotated with records from the glossary:

Automatic extraction of terminology or key concepts so far only works for English, but will be implemented for other languages, too (German, Spanish, French and Italian are planned to be released in April). Quality of extraction, as always, depends on many factors, like the amount of text and the subject area, but it is good to get a first impression of the subject matter at hand.

InterpretBank as a locally installed application raises no confidentiality issues with your client’s documents being opened and processed, as everything InterpretBank does happens on your computer (unless you use the „send document to any device“ option).

If you are more of a team glossary and online networking person, InterpretersHelp by Yann Plancqueel and Benoît Werner is the other option to manage glossaries and manually extract terminology from texts. It is quite straightforward: Adding documents works via Copy & Paste, you just paste the text into a field for the respective language so you have the two language versions displayed next to each other (but with no synchronised scrolling either). When I tried it, inserting 20 pages from a pdf worked fine. Words can be looked up in the texts using the browser search function.

The highlighting and inserting also works very swiftly and you can look up terms in Google Translate and the Oxford Dictionaries. Once you have extracted all the vocab you need, you press a button to add all the new entries to your glossary. When changing back from the glossary view to the extractor, the texts have disappeared.

InterpretersHelp as a cloud-based tool addresses the data protection issue by encrypting the data that transit to and from the website (

Of course there are zillions of other functions interpreters need for CAI tools to support their workflow perfectly. But I think that both InterpretBank and InterpretersHelp have added one super useful feature to make our lives easier. Thanks a lot!

About the author:
Anja Rütten is a freelance conference interpreter for German (A), Spanish (B), English (C) and French (C) based in Düsseldorf, Germany. She has specialised in knowledge management since the mid-1990s.

Further reading:

Summary Table of Terminology Tools for Interpreters. <>

Josh Goldsmith: The Interpreter’s Toolkit: Interpreters’ Help – a one-stop shop in the making?. In: February 12, 2018. <>.

Anja Rütten: InterpretBank 4 Review. 31 July 2017. <>.

Alexander Drechsel: App profile: Interpreters‘ Help. 2 Oct 2015. <>.

Anja Rütten: Booth-friendly terminology management revisited – two newcomers. 29 April 2014. <>








Extract Terminology in No Time | OneClick Terms | Ruckzuck Terminologie extrahieren

[for German scroll down] What do you do when you receive 100 pages to read five minutes before the conference starts? Right, you throw the text into a machine and get out a list of technical terms that give you a rough overview of what it’s all about. Now finally, it looks like this dream has come true.

OneClick Terms by SketchEngine is a browser-based (a big like) terminology extraction tool which works really swiftly. It has all it takes and nothing more (another big like): Upload – Settings – Results.

Once you are logged in for your free trial, OneClickTerms accepts the formats tmx, xliff (2.x), pdf, doc(x), html, txt. The languages supported are Czech, German, English, Spanish, French, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Dutch, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Slovak, Slovenian, Chinese Simplified, Chinese Traditional.

The settings in my opinion don’t really need to be touched. They include:

  • how rare or common should the extracted terms be
  • would you like to see the word form as it appears in the text or the base form
  • how often should a term candidate occur in the text in order to make it to the list of results
  • do you want numbers to appear in your results
  • how many terms should your list of results contain

When I tried OneClick Terms, it delivered absolutely relevant results at the first go. I uploaded an EU text on the free flow of non-personal data (pdf of about 100 pages) at about 8:55 am and the result I got at 8:57, displayed right on the same website, looked like this (and yes, the small W icons behind the words are links to related Wikipedia articles!):

It actually required rather four clicks than OneClick, but the result was worth the effort. There isn’t a lot of „noise“ (irrelevant terms) in the term candidate list, one of the reasons that often put me off in the past when I tried to use term extraction tools to prepare for an interpreting assignment. In the meeting where I tested OneClickTerms, at the end the only word I missed in the results was the regulatory scrutiny board. Interestingly, it was also missing from the list I had obtained from a German text on the same subject (Ausschuss für Regulierungskontrolle). But all the other relevant terms that popped up during the meeting were there. And what is more, by quickly scanning the extraction list in my target language, German, I could activate a lot of terminology I would otherwise definitely have had to think about twice while interpreting. So to me it definitely is a very efficient way of reducing the cognitive load in simultaneous interpreting.

The results list can be downloaded as a txt file, but copy & paste into MS Excel, for example, works just as fine, plus it puts both single and multi words into the same column. After unmerging all cells the terms can easily be sorted by frequency, which makes your five-minute emergency preparation almost perfect (as perfect as a five-minute preparation can get, that is).

Furthermore, even if you do have enough time for preparation, extracting and scanning the terminology as a first step may help you to focus on the substance when reading the text afterwards.

There is a free one month trial, after that the service can be subscribed to from 100 EUR/year (or 12.32 EUR/month) plus VAT. It includes many other features, like bilingual corpus building – but that’s a different story.

About the author:
Anja Rütten is a freelance conference interpreter for German (A), Spanish (B), English (C) and French (C) based in Düsseldorf, Germany. She has specialised in knowledge management since the mid-1990s.

Noch fünf Minuten bis zum Konferenzbeginn und ein hundertseitiges pdf zur Vorbereitung schneit (hoffentlich elektronisch) in die Kabine. Was macht man? Klar: Text in eine Maschine werfen, Knopf drücken, Terminologieliste wird ausgespuckt. Damit kann man sich dann zumindest einen groben Überblick verschaffen … Nun, es sieht so aus, als sei dieser Traum tatsächlich wahr geworden!

OneClick Terms von SketchEngine ist ein browser-basiertes (super!) Terminologieextraktionstool, das extrem einfach in der Handhabung ist. Es hat alles, was es braucht, und mehr auch nicht (ebenfalls super!). Upload – Einstellungen – Ergebnisse. Fertig.

Wenn man sich mit seinem kostenlosen Testaccount eingewählt hat, kann man eine Datei im folgenden Format hochladen: tmx, xliff (2.x), pdf, doc(x), html, txt. Die unterstützten Sprachen sind Tschechisch, Deutsch, Englisch, Spanisch, Französisch, Italienisch, Japanisch, Koreanisch, Niederländisch, Polnisch, Portugiesisch, Russisch, Slowakisch, Slowenisch, Chinesisch vereinfacht und Chinesisch traditionell.

Die Einstellungen muss man zuächst einmal gar nicht anfassen. Möchte man es doch, kann man folgende Parameter verändern:

  • wie häufig oder selten sollte der extrahierte Terminus sein
  • soll das Wort in der (deklinierten oder konjugierten) Form angezeigt werden, in der es im Text vorkommt, oder in seiner Grundform
  • wie oft muss ein Termkandidat im Text vorkommen, um es auf die Ergebnisliste zu schaffen
  • sollen Zahlen bzw. Zahl-/Buchstabenkombinationen in der Ergebnisliste erscheinen
  • wie lang soll die Ergebnisliste sein

Als ich OneClick Terms, getestet habe, bekam ich auf Anhieb äußerst relevante Ergebnisse. Ich habe um 8:55 Uhr einen EU-Text über den freien Verkehr nicht-personenbezogener Daten hochgeladen (pdf, etwa 100 Seiten) und hatte um 8:57 Uhr gleich im Browser das folgende Ergebnis angezeigt (und ja, die kleinen Ws hinter den Wörtern sind Links zu passenden Wikipedia-Artikeln!):

Es waren zwar eher vier Klicks als EinKlick, aber das Ergebnis war die Mühe Wert. Es gab wenig Rauschen (irrelevante Termini) in der Termkandidatenliste, einer der Gründe, die mich bislang davon abgehalten haben, Terminologieextraktion beim Dolmetschen zu nutzen. In der Sitzung, bei der ich OneClickTerms getestet habe, fehlte mir am Ende in der Ergebnisliste nur ein einziger wichtiger Begriff aus der Sitzung, regulatory scrutiny board. Dieser Ausschuss für Regulierungskontrolle fehlte interessanterweise auch in der Extraktionsliste, die ich zum gleichen Thema anhand eines deutschen Textes erstellt hatte. Alle anderen relevanten Termini, die während der Sitzung verwendet wurden, fanden sich aber tatsächlich in der Liste. Und noch dazu hatte ich den Vorteil, dass ich nach kurzem Scannen der Liste auf Deutsch, meiner Zielsprache, sehr viele Terminie schon aktiviert hatte, nach denen die ich ansonsten während des Dolmetschens sicher länger in meinem Gedächtnis hätte kramen müssen. Für mich definitiv ein Beitrag zur kognitiven Entlastung beim Simultandolmetschen.

Die Ergebnisliste kann man als txt-Datei herunterladen, aber Copy & Paste etwa in MS-Excel hinein funktioniert genauso gut. Man hat dann auch gleich die Einwort- und Mehrwort-Termini zusammen in einer Spalte. Wenn man den Zellenverbund aufhebt, kann man danach auch noch die Einträge bequem nach Häufigkeit sortieren. Damit ist die Fünf-Minuten-Notvorbereitung quasi perfekt (so perfekt, wie eine fünfminütige Vorbereitung eben sein kann).

Aber selbst wenn man jede Menge Zeit für die Vorbereitung hat, kann es ganz hilfreich sein, bevor man einen Text liest, die vorkommende Terminologie einmal auf einen Blick gehabt zu haben. Mir zumindest hilft das dabei, mich beim Lesen stärker auf den Inhalt als auf bestimmte Wörter zu konzentrieren.

Man kann OneClick Terms einen Monat lang kostenlos testen, danach gibt es das Abonnement ab 100,00 EUR/Jahr (oder 12,32 EUR/Monat) plus MWSt. Es umfasst noch eine ganze Reihe anderer Funktionen, etwa auch den Aufbau zweisprachiger Korpora – aber das ist dann wieder eine andere Geschichte.

Über die Autorin:
Anja Rütten ist freiberufliche Konferenzdolmetscherin für Deutsch (A), Spanisch (B), Englisch (C) und Französisch (C) in Düsseldorf. Sie widmet sich seit Mitte der 1990er dem Wissensmanagement.