Team Glossaries | Tips & Tricks von Magda und Anja | DfD 2017

Aus unserer Kurzdemo zum Thema „Teamglossare in GoogleSheets“ bei „Dolmetscher für Dolmetscher“ am 15. September 2017 in Bonn findet Ihr hier ein paar Screenshots und Kurznotizen. Detaillierte Gedanken zu gemeinsamer Glossararbeit in der Cloud findet Ihr in diesem Blogbeitrag.

Magdalena Lindner-Juhnke und Anja Rütten

Grundsätzliches zur Zusammenarbeit

  • Einladung zum Online-Glossar
  • Erwartungshaltung auf beiden Seiten
  • “Share Economy” oder Schutz des Urheberrechts/vertrauensvolle Zusammenarbeit
  • Organisation in Ablage/eigene und gemeinsame Ordner
  • Glossarstruktur – mehrere Reiter?
  • Vorteile/Bedenken
  • Teilnehmerstimmen
  • “Live-Teamarbeit” vor und während der Konferenz
  • “praktisch, sich […] GEMEINSAM vorzubereiten”, einheitliche Terminologie, Zeitersparnis
  • Glossar sortieren nach Chronologie im Vortrag -> Absprache
  • “Ich kann mit Word besser umgehen als mit Excel …”
  • “Teilen mit anderen Kabinen evtl. zu kompliziert?”
  • “Datenschutz?“

Musterglossar

demo glossary

Word geht auch!

word works, too

Aufbau (z.B. Zeilen/Spalten fixieren) oder Kopie erstellen

copy document

Die wichtigsten Kniffe, um nicht zu verzweifeln

  • Textumbruch oder fortlaufend, Textausrichtung in Zelle
  • Absatz in Zelle (Alt+Enter) – Vorsicht, zerschießt beim Exportieren evtl. die Tabellenstruktur
  • Suchen (Strg+F), alle Tabellenblätter durchsuchen
  • Zellen kopieren
  • Zeilen/Reiter hinzufügen
  • Spalten/Zeilen fixieren
  • Jedem eine “Privatspalte” zuweisen, für eigene Prioritäten/Anmerkungen etc.
  • Tabellendatei hochladen (schlecht zu bearbeiten) vs. Tabelle in Google erstellen – Kollegen fragen oder Webinar besuchen!

Kommentare, Chat, Kommentarspalte

comment in table

Sortierung, Chronologie

(nicht ohne Absprache umsortieren, es sei denn die ursprüngliche Reihenfolge lässt sich wieder herstellen)

sort chronologically

Datensicherung (was ist, wenn jemand anderes das komplette Glossar zerstört)

Private Filteransichten (bei großen Datenbeständen)

Herunterladen, Drucken, oder Copy&Paste

Paralleltexte “alignieren”

Alternative Airtable (verschlüsselt)

InterpretBank 4 review

InterpretBank by Claudio Fantinuoli, one of the pioneers of terminology tools for conference interpreters (or CAI tools), already before the new release was full to the brim with useful functions and settings that hardly any other tool offers. It was already presented in one of the first articles of this blog, back in 2014. So now I was all the more curious to find out about the 4th generation, and I am happy to share my impressions in the following article.

Getting started

It took me 2 minutes to download and install the new InterpretBank and set my working languages (1 mother tongue plus 4 languages). My first impression is that the user interface looked quite familiar: language columns (still empty) and the familiar buttons to switch between edit, memorize and conference mode. The options menu lets you set display colours, row height and many other things. You can select the online sources for looking up terminology (linguee, IATE, LEO, DICT, Wordreference and Reverso) and definitions (Wikipedia, Collins, Dictionary.com) as well as set automatic translation services (search IATE/old glossaries, use different online translation memories like glosbe and others).

Xlsx, docx and ibex (proprietary InterpretBank format) files can be imported easily, and unlike the former InterpretBank, I don’t have to change the display settings any more in order to have all my five languages displayed. Great improvement! Apart from the terms in five languages, you can import an additional “info” field and a link related to each language as well as a “bloc note”, which refers to the complete entry.

Data storage and sharing

All glossaries are saved on your Windows or Mac computer in a unique database. I haven’t tested the synchronization between desktop and laptop, which is done via Dropbox or any other shared folder. The online sharing function using a simple link worked perfectly fine for me. You just open a glossary, upload it to the secure InterpretBank server, get the link and send it to whomever you like, including yourself. On my Android phone, the plain two-language interface opened smoothly in Firefox. And although I always insist on having more than two languages in my term database, I would say that for mobile access, two languages are perfect, as consecutive interpreting usually happens between two languages back and forth and squeezing more than two languages onto a tiny smartphone screen might not be the easiest thing to do either.

I don’t quite get the idea why I should share this link with colleagues, though. Usually you either have a shared glossary in the first place, with all members of the team editing it and making contributions, or everyone has separate glossaries and there is hardly any need of sharing. If I wanted to share my InterpretBank glossary at all, I would export it and send it via email or copy it into a cloud-based team glossary, so that my colleagues can use it at their convenience.

The terminology in InterpretBank is divided into glossaries and subglossaries. Technically, everything is stored in one single database, “glossary” and “subglossary” just being data fields containing a topic classification and sub-classification. Importing only works glossary by glossary, i.e. I can’t import my own (quite big) database as a whole, converting the topic classification data fields into glossaries and sub-glossaries.

Glossary creation

After having imported an existing glossary, I now create a new one from scratch (about cars). In edit mode, with the display set to two languages only, InterpretBank will look up translations in online translation memories for you. All you have to do is press F1 or using the right mouse button or, if you prefer, the search is done automatically upon pressing the tab key, i.e. jumping from one language field to the next –empty– one. When I tried “Pleuelstange” (German for connecting rod), no Spanish translation could be found. But upon my second try, “Kotflügel” (German for mudguard), the Spanish “guardabarros” was found in MEDIAWIKI.

By pressing F2, or right-click on the term you want a translation for, you can also search your pre-selected online resources for translations and definitions. If, however, all your language fields are filled and you only want to double-check or think that what is in your glossary isn’t correct, the program will tell you that nothing is missing and therefore no online search can be made. Looking up terminology in several online sources in one go is something many a tool has tried to make possible. My favourite so far being http://sb.qtrans.de, I must say that I quite like the way InterpretBank displays the online search results. It will open one (not ten or twenty) browser tabs where you can select the different sources to see the search results.

The functions for collecting reference texts on specific topics and extracting relevant terminology haven’t yet been integrated into InterpretBank (but, as Claudio assured me, will be in the autumn). However, the functions are already available in a separate tool named TranslatorBank (so far for German, English, French and Italian).

Quick lookup function for the booth

While searching in „normal“ edit mode is accent and case sensitive, in conference mode (headset icon) it is intuitive and hardly demands any attention. The incremental search function will narrow down the hit list with every additional letter you type. And there are many option to customize the behaviour of the search function. Actually, the „search parameters panel“ says it all: Would you like to search in all languages or just your main language? Hit enter or not to start your query? If not, how many seconds would you like the system to wait until it starts a fresh query? Ignore accents or not? Correct typos? Search in all glossaries if nothing can be found in the current one? Most probably very useful in the booth.

When toying around with the search function, I didn’t find my typos corrected, at least not that I was aware of. When typing „gardient“ I would have thought that the system corrected it into „gradient“, which it didn’t. However, when I typed „blok“, the system deleted the last letter and returned all the terms containing „block“. Very helpful indeed.

In order to figure out how the system automatically referred to IATE when no results were found in my own database, I entered „Bruttoinlandsprodukt“ (gross domestic product in German). Firstly, the system froze (in shock?), but then the IATE search result appeared in four of my five languages in the list, as Dutch isn’t supported and would have to be bought separately. At least I suppose it was the IATE result, as the source wasn’t indicated anywhere and it just looked like a normal glossary entry.

Queries in different web sources hitting F2 also works in booth mode, just as described above for edit mode. The automatic translation (F1) only works in a two-language display, which in turn can only be set in edit mode.

Memorize new terms

The memorizing function, in my view, hasn’t changed too much, which is good because I like it the way it was before. The only change I have noticed is that it will now let you memorize terms in all your languages and doesn’t only work with language pairs. I like it!

Summary

All in all, in my view InterpretBank remains number one in sophistication among the terminology tools made for (and mostly by) conference interpreters. None of the other tools I am aware of covers such a wide range of an interpreter’s workflow. I would actually not call it a terminology management tool, but a conference preparation tool.

The changes aren’t as drastic as I would have expected after reading the announcement, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing, the old InterpretBank not having been completely user-unfriendly in the first place. But the user interface has indeed become more intuitive and I found my way around more easily.

The new online look-up elements are very relevant, and they work swiftly. Handling more than two languages has become easier, so as long as you don’t want to work with more than five languages in total, you should be fine. If it weren’t for the flexibility of a generic database like MS Access and the many additional data fields I have grown very fond of , like client, date and name of the conference, degree of importance, I would seriously consider becoming an InterpretBank user. But then even if one prefers keeping one’s master terminology database in a different format, thanks to the export function InterpretBank could still be used for conference preparation and booth work „only“.

Finally, whatwith online team glossaries becoming common practice, I hope to see a browser-based InterpretBank 5 in the future!

PS: One detail worth mentioning is the log file InterpretBank saves for you if you tell it to. Here you can see all the changes and queries made, which I find a nice thing not only for research purposes, but also to do a personal follow-up after a conference (or before the next conference of the same kind) and see which were the terms that kept my mind busy. Used properly, this log file could serve to close the circle of knowledge management.

About the author:
Anja Rütten is a freelance conference interpreter for German (A), Spanish (B), English (C) and French (C) based in Düsseldorf, Germany. She has specialised in knowledge management since the mid-1990s.

Wissensmanagement im Konferenzdolmetschen – ein bisschen Theorie

Was bedeutet eigentlich Wissensmanagement für Konferenzdolmetscher?

Was man für einen Dolmetscheinsatz wissen muss, ist schnell beschrieben: So ziemlich alles in allen Arbeitssprachen. Auf der Händlertagung eines Waschmaschinenherstellers kann es plötzlich um Fußballtaktik gehen, der CFO bei einer Bilanzpressekonferenz hat womöglich eine Schwäche für Bibelzitate. Deshalb gilt grundsätzlich: Die Vorbereitung ist nie zu Ende. Da aber bekanntlich Zeit Geld ist und selbst Dolmetscher nicht alles wissen können, ist bei unserer Informations- und Wissensarbeit der Management-Begriff entscheidend, das Streben nach dem Bestmöglichen zur Erreichung des Ziels (anstelle eins unreflektierten Abarbeitens).

Strategisch ist dabei die qualifizierte Entscheidung zwischen dem Bereithalten von Information (auf Papier oder im Computer) und dem Aneignen von Wissen (im Kopf). Dieses Wechselspiel zwischen Daten, Information und Wissen ist typisch für die verschiedenen – ineinandergreifenden – Verarbeitungsebenen der Dolmetschvorbereitung:

Zusammentragen von Daten und Recherche relevanter Informationen (Tagesordnung, alte Protokolle, Präsentationen, Manuskripte, Webseiten der involvierten Parteien, Glossare),

fehlende Information wie Sachzusammenhänge und terminologische Lücken recherchieren, Auswertung und Aufbereitung der Informationen,

Nutzung der aufbereiteten Informationen, also Abgleichen mit dem eigenen Wissensbestand, Abruf und Einbindung (gezieltes Lernen der wichtigsten Terminologie und Sachverhalte bzw. das intuitive Auffindbarmachen im Dolmetscheinsatz).

Semiotik des Dolmetschens

Ähnlich wie in einem Zeichensystem finden sich auch in der Dolmetschsituation drei Informations- und Wissensdimensionen: die sprachliche, wahrnehmbare Form, die Begriffswelt (Inhalt) und die außersprachliche Wirklichkeit (Situation). Diese drei „Himmelsrichtungen“ können in der Dolmetschvorbereitung als innerer Kompass Orientierung bieten.

Anders als Übersetzer oder Terminologen arbeiten Dolmetscher für den Moment, für eine einmalige Situation mit einer definierten Gruppe von Beteiligten. Entsprechend hat diese Situation mehr Gewicht, verleit aber auch mehr Freiheit. „Richtig“ gedolmetscht ist, was hier akzeptiert oder bevorzugt wird, auch wenn es außerhalb dieser Runde niemand verstehen würde. Was korrekt belegt ist, sei es durch eine Norm, ein Nachschlagewerk oder Referenzliteratur, wird umgekehrt nicht zwingend von den Zuhörern verstanden, sei es aufgrund des Bildungshintergrundes oder auch einer anderen regionalen Herkunft.

Selbstverständlich ist es durchaus wichtig, die andersprachigen Benennungen etwa für Aktiengesellschaft, Vorstand, Aufsichtsrat und Verwaltungsrat zu kennen (Form). Im Notfall sind solche Benennungen aber nachschlagbar oder (oft effizienter) mit Druck auf die Räuspertaste bei den Kollegen erfragbar. Ist der semantische Zusammenhang zwischen diesen Begriffen bzw. die Unterschiede zwischen den Systemen unterschiedlicher Länder nicht klar (Inhalt), so wird das Füllen dieser Verständnislücke ad hoc schwierig, und die durch fehlendes Verständnis entstehenden inhaltlichen Dolmetschfehler wiegen oft schwerer als „das falsche Wort“, das aber den Inhalt dennoch transportiert. Noch irritierender wirkt es mitunter, wenn das situative Verständnis fehlt, sprich die Funktion des Aufsichtsratsvorsitzenden mit der des Vorstandsvorsitzenden verwechselt wird. Bei aller sprachlich-fachlichen Einarbeitung sollte man daher nie vergessen, sich die konkrete Kommunikationssituation zu vergegenwärtigen.

Wenn nun also Informations- und Wissensmanagement für Dolmetscher bedeutet, sich nach jedem Dolmetscheinsatz zu fragen, ob man als Wissensarbeiter optimal gearbeitet hat, wo sind denn dann die Stellschrauben, an denen man drehen kann? Grundsätzlich lohnt es sich, verschiedene Optimierungsansätze für sich selbst einmal zu durchdenken.

Selektion

Die hohe Kunst der effizienten Dolmetschvorbereitung – bzw. des Informationsmanagements im Allgemeinen – liegt häufig im Abwägen: Welche Informationen bzw . welches Wissen benötigt man (am dringendsten), was ist entbehrlich? Siehe hierzu auch Not-To-Learn Words.

Extraktion

Bei tausend Seiten Text, zweitausend Powerpoint-Folien oder einem 400-Einträge-Glossar ist es eine gute Idee, das Wichtigste (siehe oben) zu extrahieren/herauszufiltern/herauszusuchen. Für die Extraktion von Terminologie aus Texten gibt es mehr oder weniger gut funktionierende Tools. Für die inhaltliche Seite lohnt sich mitunter auch die Suche nach “menschlichen” Zusammenfassungen zu bestimmten Themen, zu vielen bekannteren Büchern gibt es für wenig Geld auch redaktionell angefertigte Zusammenfassungen, die EU hat gar eine spezielle Seite mit Zusammenfassungen von Rechtsakten angelegt.

Eingrenzen und Erweitern

Meistens hat man entweder zu viel oder zu wenig Information.

Im Internet lässt sich das zu viel oder unbrauchbar oft durch ein paar Handgriffe erledigen: Verwenden von Ausschlusswörtern (ein Minuszeichen oder NOT vor das Wort setzen), Eingrenzung auf eine bestimmte Seite (site:) verwandte Seiten finden (related:), Definitionen suchen (define:), Berücksichtigung von Synonymen bei der Suche (~), Herkunftsland (loc:) usw. Wenn man die zahlreichen Online-Nachschlagewerke durchsuchen möchte, können Such-Tools, die verschiedene Quellen gleichzeitig durchsuchen, die Arbeit erleichtern und Nerven schonen – so etwa sb.qtrans.de.

Bei der eigenen Terminologie ist es wichtig, dass man die Suche wahlweise nach Themenbereich („Bilanzen“), Kunden, Sprachen, Anlass („Jahresbilanzpressekonferenz Firma XY in Z“) oder Art der Veranstaltung (etwa EBR) eingrenzen kann.

Übersichtlichkeit

Verbringt man (gefühlt) mehr Zeit mit dem Suchen als mit dem Finden, so kann es sinnvoll sein, gedanklich einen Schritt zurückzutreten und zu überlegen, an welcher Stelle genau es ruckelt. Beispielsweise kann man zu einem Auftrag alle Informationen in einer Excel-Datei sammeln (Tagesordnung, Glossar etc.), um diese auf einen Schlag durchsuchen zu können. Bei sehr vielen Manuskripten oder zu diskutierenden Sitzungsdokumenten können auch Notizbuch-Programme wie MS-OneNote oder Evernote hervorragend für Übersicht und Ordnung sorgen. Prinzipiell findet man seine Termini schneller, wenn man sie in einer einzigen Datenbank ablegt und nicht in unterschiedlichen Dokumenten – denn früher oder später gibt es immer Überschneidungen zwischen verschiedenen Einsatzbereichen oder Kunden. Muss man in der Kabine mit dem Blick bzw. der Aufmerksamkeit ständig zwischen Computer und Papierunterlagen wechseln, kann es sich lohnen, eine bewusste Entscheidung gegen diesen Medienbruch zu treffen und konsequent am Rechner oder auf Papier zu arbeiten.

Wenn in einer Sitzung mit Paralleltexten gearbeitet wird, etwa wenn ein Vertragstext diskutiert wird, lohnt es sich, über eine ordentliche Paralleltextanzeige nachzudenken. Oft leistet das Kopieren in eine Tabelle hier wahre Wunder, aber auch der Import in ein Translation-Memory-System ist, wenn das Alignieren einigermaßen funktioniert, eine sehr komfortable Kabinenlösung. Selbst pdfs in mehreren Sprachen lassen sich mit einem praktischen Tool nebeneinanderlegen.

Strukturierung

Ordnung ist da halbe Leben … warum eigentlich? Ganz einfach: Man verbringt nicht so viel Lebenszeit mit dem Überlegen, wo man dieses und jenes nun hinräumen soll bzw. hingeräumt hat. Deshalb ist beispielsweise eine ordentliche Dateiablagesystematik und eine Terminologiedatenbank ein Beitrag zur schnellen Wissenslückenfüllung im Dolmetscheinsatz sowie zur allgemeinen Dolmetscherzufriedenheit. Hinzu kommt, dass eine gute Datenstruktur der beste Weg zur Null-Nachbereitung ist. Zumindest beim Simultandolmetschen meist leicht zu bewerkstelligen, ist es nützlicher, motivierender und leichter zu merken, Wissenslücken gleich in der Anwendungssituation zu recherchieren. Wenn man die gefundene Information ordentlich ablegt (Terminologie dem Kunden/Thema/Anlass zugeordnet), erübrigt sich die Nachbereitung am eigenen Schreibtisch.

Systematisierung und Beschleunigung

Egal, wie gut man sich strukturiert und organisiert, manchmal ist man einfach nicht schnell genug oder vergisst das Wichtigste. Hier hilft es, Standards zu schaffen. Handlungen, die eine Gewohnheit sind, erfordern weniger Aufmerksamkeit und Energie. Immer die gleiche Ablagesystematik bei E-Mails und Dokumenten, eine Checkliste für die Angebotserstellung, Standardfragen („Wer macht Was mit Wem Wozu?“) bei mündlichen Kundenbriefings, Rituale bei der Aktivierung von Passivwissen. Manches kann man auch an den Computer delegieren, zum Beispiel die Erinnerung an die Steuererklärung oder das Abonnieren von Zeitungen und Newslettern.

Oft kann Software helfen, etwa beim gleichzeitigen Durchsuchen unzähliger Dateien mit einer Desktopsuchmaschine, beim Abgleich von Texten mit Glossaren oder bei der Alignierung verschiedener Sprachfassungen mittels eines Translation-Memory-Systems. Aber auch rein geistige, nicht computergestützte Fähigkeiten lassen sich beschleunigen, so etwa durch das Erlernen effizienterer Lesetechniken wie Improved Reading.

Kooperation und Arbeitsteilung

Noch relativ neu, aber aus dem Dolmetschalltag vieler Kollegen schon kaum noch wegzudenken, sind cloudbasierte Plattformen zur Teamzusammenarbeit. Vor allem bei extrem fachspezifischen und dichten Konferenzen, in denen das Dolmetschteam sich die Vorbereitungsarbeit teilt, bieten sie eine Möglichkeit, emeinsam und doch unabhängig voneinander v.a. Terminlogie zu erarbeiten und Dokumente abzulegen. Die Vorteile liegen auf der Hand: Das Team ist immer auf dem gleichen Stand, kann sich zu Detailfragen austauschen, jeder kann die Wissenslücken des anderen ergänzen. Wenn eine solche einfache Datenbank gut strukturiert ist, hat auch jeder die Möglichkeit, seine persönliche Ansicht zu generieren, ohne von subjektiv als irrelevant empfundenen Daten „gestört“ zu werden.

Und bei dieser Vielzahlt an Möglichkeiten gilt natürlich genau wie in der Kabine: Nur nicht die Übersicht verlieren 😉

————————
Über die Autorin:
Anja Rütten ist freiberufliche Konferenzdolmetscherin für Deutsch (A), Spanisch (B), Englisch (C) und Französisch (C) in Düsseldorf. Sie widmet sich seit Mitte der 1990er dem Wissensmanagement.

Informations- und Wissensmanagement im Konferenzdolmetschen. Sabest 15. Frankfurt: Peter Lang. [Dissertation] www.peterlang.net