Hello from the other side – Chinese and Terminology Tools. A guest article by Felix Brender 王哲謙

As Mandarin Chinese interpreters, we understand that we are somewhat rare beings. After all, we work with a language which, despite being a UN language, is not one you’d encounter regularly. We wouldn’t expect colleagues working with other, more frequently used languages to know about the peculiarities of Mandarin.

This applies not least to terminology tools. Many of the tools available to interpreters do now support Chinese-script entries. And indeed: Interpreting from English into Chinese, terminology software works as well for Chinese as it would for any other language – next to good old Excel, I myself have used InterPlex, Interpret Bank and flashterm. It’s rather when working from Chinese into English that things get tricky – and that’s not necessarily a software issue.

Until recently, many interpreters were convinced and rather adamant that simultaneous interpreting with Chinese is downright impossible, and I am sometimes tempted to agree. Compared to English – left alone German – Chinese is incredibly dense. Many words consist of only one syllable, and only very few of more than two. Owing to the way Chinese works grammatically, the very same idea can be expressed a lot more concisely in Chinese than English. To make matters worse, we replace modern Mandarin expressions with written, Classical Chinese equivalents in formal Mandarin. As a rule of thumb, the more formal the Chinese used, the more succinct it will be as well – rather different from English or German. This also is the case with proper names and terminology, which will usually have abbreviated forms that are a lot shorter syllable-wise than their English equivalents.

Adding to that, Chinese natives are incredibly fond of their language and make ample use of its full range of options: Using rare and at times byzantine expressions and words is appreciated and applauded as a sign of good education; it is never perceived as pedantic or conceited. This includes idioms (chengyu 成語), which usually refer to a story from the Chinese Classics in a highly condensed fashion: They generally contain a mere four syllables and usually function as adjectives, in contrast to English or German. In English, we will need at least a full sentence to explain what is being said, even if the same or a similar idiom exists. Chinese also frequently uses xiehouyu 歇後語: proverbs consisting of two parts, the first presenting a scenario, the second outlining the rationale of the story. Usually, the second part will be left out because Chinese natives will be able to deduce it from the first – similar to speak of the devil (and he will appear) in English. Needless to say, there hardly ever is an English equivalent, and seeing that we are operating in entirely different cultural contexts, ironing out cultural differences when explaining xiehouyu will take additional time.

It will be no surprise to hear that Chinese discursive and grammatical peculiarities make it a difficult language to interpret from: relative clauses tend to be lengthy – and are always placed in front of the noun they describe; Chinese doesn’t mark tenses as such but rather uses particles to outline how different events and actions relate to each other, in contrast to linear notions of time and tenses in European languages, so we are often left guessing; he and she are homonyms in Mandarin; to name but three examples.

Considering all of this, we see that more often than not, simultaneous interpreting from Chinese is a race against the clock and an exercise in humility – and there isn’t much time to look up words in the first place.

In Modern Mandarin, there are only around 1,200 possible syllables, with each syllable being a morpheme, i.e. a component bearing meaning; in English, we have a far greater range of possible syllables, and they only make sense in context, as not every syllable carries meaning: /mea/ and /ning/ do not mean anything per se, but meaning does. For Chinese, this implies that homophones are a common occurrence. And while we aim for perfect clarity and lucidity in English, Chinese rather daoistically indulges in ambivalence. Clever plays on words, being illusive and vague and giving listeners space to interpret what you might actually mean: not bad style, but an art to be honed. Apart from having to spend more capacity and time on identifying terms and words used in the original, this adds another layer of difficulty with regards to looking up terminology in the booth: The fastest way to type Chinese characters is by using pinyin romanisation, but owing to the huge number of homonyms, any syllable in romanized transliteration will give you a huge range of options. This means that we would have to spend at least another second or so simply to select the correct character from a drop-down list – and we will not enjoy the pleasure of word prediction that works for other languages.

In practice, this means that besides very intensive preparation before the event, we rely on what might be the oldest terminology tool in the world: our booth buddy. They are particularly important because in Chinese, we obviously don’t have any cognates – something than might get us off the hook working with European languages. We also heavily rely on our colleagues sitting next to us for figures: Chinese has ten thousand (萬) and one hundred million (億) as units in their own right, so rather than talking about one million and one billion, the Chinese will talk about a hundred times ten thousand and ten times one hundred million, respectively. This means we will have to be calculating while interpreting: a feat hard to accomplish if you are out there on your own.

While I started out thinking that not being able to use terminology software to the same extent I would use it for German-English would be quite a nuisance, I have found that this is rather an instance of the old man living at the border whose horse runs away1, as you’d say in Chinese. Interpreting is teamwork after all, and working with Chinese, we are acutely aware that we rely on our booth buddy as much as they rely on us and that we can only provide the excellent service we do with somebody else in the booth. With that in mind, professional Chinese interpreters always make for great partners in crime in the booth.

About the author:

Felix Brender 王哲謙 is a freelance conference interpreter for English, Chinese and German based in Düsseldorf/Germany. He also teaches DE>EN at the University of Heidelberg, and ZH>EN interpreting as a guest lecturer in Leeds, UK, and Taipei, Taiwan.

1 (which, as the story goes, then returns, bringing a fine stallion with it, which is then ridden by his son, who falls of the horse and breaks his leg, which is why he is not drafted and sent to war, ultimately saving his life; meaning that any setback may indeed be a blessing in disguise, similar but not entirely identical to every cloud has a silver lining. One of the most frequently used Chinese sayings, eight syllables of which the latter four are generally left out: 塞翁失馬,焉知非福, which literally translates as ‘When the old man from the frontier lost his horse, how could one have known that it would not be fortuitous?’. I rest my case.)

Booth-friendly terminology management: Glossarmanager.de

Believe it or not, only a few weeks ago I came across just another booth-friendly terminology management program (or rather it was kindly brought to my attention by a student when I talked about the subject at Heidelberg University). It has been around since 2008 and completely escaped my attention. So I am all the happier to present today yet another player on the scene of interpreter-friendly terminology management tools:

Glossarmanager by Glossarmanager GbR/Frank Brempel (Bonn, Germany)

As the name suggests, in Glossarmanager terms are organised in different glossaries, each glossary including the data fields language 1 („Sprache 1“), language 2 („Sprache 2“), synonym, antonym, picture and comment. The number of working languages in each glossary is limited to two (or three if you decide to use the synonyms column for a third language). Each glossary can also be subdivided into chapters („Kapitel“).

Glossarmanager GlossarEdit

You may import and export rtf, csv and txt files, so basically anything that formerly was a text or table/spreadsheet document, and the import function is very user-friendly (it lets you insert the new data into an existing glossary and checks new entries against existing ones, or create a new glossary).

The vocab training module requires typing in and is very unforgiving, so each typo or other deviation from what is written in the database counts as a mistake. But if you are not put off by the nasty comments („That was rubbish“, „Please concentrate!“) or the even nastier learning record, you may well use this trainer as a mental memorising tool without typing the required terms.

The search module comes as a small window which, if you want it to, always stays in the foreground. Entering search terms is intuitive and mouse-free and the results can be filtered by language pairs, glossaries and authors. Ignoring of special characters like ü, è, ß etc. and case-sensitive search can be activated. Right under the hit list, Glossarmanager provides (customisable) links to online resources for further searching.

Glossarmanager Suche

Available for Windows

Cost: Free of charge (download here and use the free licence key)

————————–

About the author:
Anja Rütten is a freelance conference interpreter for German (A), Spanish (B), English (C) and French (C) based in Düsseldorf, Germany. She has specialised in knowledge management since the mid-1990s.

 

Airtable.com – a great replacement for Google Sheets | tolle Alternative zu Google Sheets

+++ for English see below +++

Mit der Terminologieverwaltung meiner Träume muss man alles können: Daten teilen, auf allen Geräten nutzen und online wie offline darauf zugreifen (wie mit Interpreters’ Help/Boothmate für Mac oder auch Google Sheets), möglichst unbedenklich Firmenterminologie und Hintergrundinfos des Kunden dort speichern (wie bei Interpreters’ Help), sortieren und filtern (wie in MS Access, MS Excel, Lookup, InterpretBank, Termbase und anderen), individuelle Voreinstellungen wie Abfragen und Standardwerte festlegen (wie in MS Access) und, ganz wichtig: den Terminologiebestand so durchsuchen, dass es kaum Aufmerksamkeit kostet, also blind tippend und ohne Maus, eine inkrementelle Suche, die sich nicht darum schert, ob ich “rinon” oder “riñón” eingebe, und mir so oder so sagt, dass das Ding auf Deutsch Niere heißt, möglichst in Form einer gut lesbaren Trefferliste (wie Interplex und InterpretBank es tun).

Airtable, eine gelungene Mischung aus Tabellenkalkulation und Datenbank, kommt der Sache ziemlich nah. Es ist sehr intuitiv in der Handhabung und sieht einfach gut aus. Das Sortieren und Filtern geht sehr leicht von der Hand, man kann jedem Datensatz Bilder, Dateianhänge und Links hinzufügen und unterschiedliche Abfragen (“Views”)  von Teilbeständen der Terminologie (etwa für einen bestimmten Kunden, ein Thema, eine bestimmte Veranstaltungsart oder eine Kombination aus allem) definieren und auch Standartwerte für bestimmte Felder festlegen, damit man z. B. den Kundennamen, die Konferenzbezeichnung und das Thema nicht jedesmal neu eingeben muss. Die Detailansicht, die aufpoppt, wenn man auf eine Zeile klickt, ist auch super.  Eigene Tabellen lassen sich in Nullkommanix per Drag & Drop einfügen oder importieren. Und im Übrigen gibt es eine Menge nützlicher Tastenkombinationen.

Teamglossare (oder was auch immer) können von verschiedenen Personen über die iPad-, iPhone- oder Android-(beta)-App oder die Browseroberflächer bearbeitet werden. Allerdings können bei Zugriff über den Browser die Daten nicht offline bearbeitet und später online synchronisiert werden. Das funktioniert nur über die mobile App. Die Daten werden bei der Übermittlung und Speicherung verschlüsselt.

Nur eine Sache vermisse ich bei Airtable schmerzlich, nämlich die oben beschriebene intuitive, akzent-ignorierende Suchfunktion, die ihre Fundstücke in einer Trefferliste präsentiert, statt mich von Suchergebnis zu Suchergebnis hüpfen zu lassen. Ansonsten aber eine wahrhaft schnuckeliges Datenbankanwendung, nicht nur für Terminologie!

Airtable ist kostenlos, solange jede Tabelle nicht mehr als 1500 Zeilen umfasst. Für bis zu 5000 Zeilen bezahlt man 12 $ monatlich und für bis zu 50 000 Zeilen 24 $.

Übrigens: Eine Übersicht von am Markt verfügbaren Terminologieverwaltungsprogrammen für Dolmetscher findet sich hier.

————————–

Über die Autorin:
Anja Rütten ist freiberufliche Konferenzdolmetscherin für Deutsch (A), Spanisch (B), Englisch (C) und Französisch (C) in Düsseldorf. Sie widmet sich seit Mitte der 1990er dem Wissensmanagement.

+++ English version +++

My perfect terminology database must be shareable, portable and accessible both on and off line (like Interpreters’ Help/Boothmate for Mac and also Google Sheets) but at the same time trustworthy to the point that companies feel comfortable having their terminology stored there (like Interpreters’ Help), sortable and filterable (like MS Access, MS Excel, Lookup, InterpretBank, Termbase and others), customisable with pre-defined views and default values (like in MS Access) and, very importantly, searchable in a way that requires almost no attention – meaning a mouse-free, incremental search function that does not care whether I type “rinon” or “riñón” and tells me that it is kidney in English either way (like Interplex and InterpretBank do), if possible in an easy-to-read hit list.

Airtable, a mix of spreadsheet and database, seems to get very close to it. It is very intuitive to handle and, even more so, it looks just nice and friendly. It has very comfortable sorting and filtering, you can add pictures, links and files, define different views of subsets of your data (like for a specific customer, particular subject area, type of conference or a combination thereof) and set default values so that, while working at a given conference, you don’t need to type the conference name, customer and subject area time and again when entering new terms. And the detailed view of each data set popping up at one click or tap is just lovely. You can import or drag and drop your tables in no time. And Airtable has loads of useful keyboard shortcuts, by the way.

Team glossaries (or anything else) can be worked on by several people and accessed via an iPad, iPhone and Android (beta) app or the browser-based interface, although, when using the browser interface, there is no way to edit your data offline and update the online version later. This works on the mobile apps only. Data being transferred back and forth as well as stored data are encrypted.

The one thing I miss most on Airtable is an intuitive, accent-ignoring search function as described above, which displays hit lists instead of jumping from one search hit to the next. But apart from that, Airtable is just great for data management, not only in terms of „terms“.

It is free of charge as long as your tables don’t have more than 1500 lines, costs 12 $ per month for up to 5000 lines per database and 24 $ for up to 50 000 lines per database.

If you need an overview of available terminology management tools for conference interpreters, click here.

————————–

About the author:
Anja Rütten is a freelance conference interpreter for German (A), Spanish (B), English (C) and French (C) based in Düsseldorf, Germany. She has specialised in knowledge management since the mid-1990s.

 

Dictation Software instead of Term Extraction? | Diktiersoftware als Termextraktion für Dolmetscher?

+++ for English see below +++

Als neulich mein Arzt bei unserem Beratungsgespräch munter seine Gedanken dem Computer diktierte, anstatt zu tippen, kam mir die Frage in den Sinn: „Warum mache ich das eigentlich nicht?“ Es folgte eine kurze Fachsimpelei zum Thema Diktierprogramme, und kaum zu Hause, musste ich das natürlich auch gleich ausprobieren. Das High-End-Produkt Dragon Naturally Speaking, von dem mein Arzt schwärmte, wollte ich mir dann aber doch nicht gleich gönnen.  Das muss doch auch mit Windows gehen und mit dem im Notebook eingebauten Raummikrofon, dachte ich mir (haha) … Eingerichtet war auch alles in Nullkommanix (unter Windows 10 Auf Start klicken, den Menüpunkt „Erleichterte Bedienung“ suchen, “ Windowsspracherkennung“ auswählen) und los ging’s. Beim ersten Start durchläuft man zunächst ein kurzes Lernprogramm, das die Stimme kennenlernt.

Und dann konnte es auch schon losgehen mit dem eingebauten Diktiergerät, zunächst testhalber in Microsoft Word. Von den ersten zwei Spracheingaben war ich auch noch einigermaßen beeindruckt, aber schon bei „Desoxyribonukleinsäure“ zerplatzten alle meine Träume. Hier meine ersten Diktierproben mit ein paar gängigen Ausdrücken aus dem Dolmetschalltag:

– 12345
– Automobilzulieferer
– Besserungszeremonien Kline sollte es auch viel wie Wohnen Nucleinsäuren für das (Desoxyribonukleinsäure)
– Beste Rock Siri Wohnung Klee ihnen sollte noch in Welle (Desoxyribonukleinsäure)
– Verlustvortrag
– Rechnungsabgrenzungsposten
– Vorrats Datenspeicherung
– Noch Händewellenlänge (Nockenwelle)
– Keilriemen
– Brennstoffzellen Fahrzeuge

Gar nicht schlecht. Aber so ganz das Spracherkennungswunder war das nun noch nicht. In meiner Phantasie hatte ich mich nämlich in der Dolmetschvorbereitung Texte und Präsentationen entspannt lesen und dabei alle Termini und Zusammenhänge, die ich im Nachgang recherchieren wollte, in eine hübsche Tabelle diktieren sehen.  Aber dazu musste dann wohl etwas „Richtiges“ her, wahrscheinlich zunächst einmal ein gescheites Mikrofon.

Also setzte ich mich dann doch mit der allseits gepriesenen Diktiersoftware Dragon Naturally Speaking auseinander, chattete mit dem Support und prüfte alle Optionen. Für 99 EUR unterstützt die Home-Edition nur die gewählte Sprache. Die Premium-Version für 169 EUR unterstützt die gewählte Sprache und auch Englisch. Ist die gewählte Sprache Englisch, gibt es nur Englisch. Möchte ich mit Deutsch, Spanisch, Englisch und womöglich noch meiner zweiten C-Sprache Französisch arbeiten, wird es also erstens kompliziert und zweitens teuer. Also verwarf ich das ganze Thema erst einmal, bis wenige Tage später in einem völlig anderen Zusammenhang unsere liebe Kollegin Fee Engemann erwähnte, dass sie mit Dragon arbeite. Da wurde ich natürlich hellhörig und habe es mir dann doch nicht nehmen lassen, sie für mich und Euch ein bisschen nach ihrer Erfahrung mit Spracherkennungssoftware auszuhorchen:


Fee Engemann im Interview am 19. Februar 2016

Wie ist die Qualität der Spracherkennung bei Dragon Naturally Speaking?

Erstaunlich gut. Das Programm lernt die Stimme und Sprechweise kennen und man kann ihm auch neue Wörter „beibringen“, oder es liest über sein „Lerncenter“ ganze Dateien aus. Man kann auch Wörter buchstabieren, wenn das System gar nichts mehr versteht.

Wozu benutzt Du Dragon?

Ich benutze es manchmal als OCR-Ersatz, wenn eine Übersetzungsvorlage nicht maschinenlesbar ist. Das hat den Vorteil, dass man gleich den Text einmal komplett gelesen hat.

In der Dolmetschvorbereitung diktiere ich meine Terminologie in eine Liste, die ich dann nachher durch die Begriffe in der anderen Sprache ergänze. Das funktioniert in Word und auch in Excel. Falls es Schwierigkeiten gibt, liegt das evtl. daran, dass sich die Kompatibilitätsmodule für ein bestimmtes Programm deaktiviert haben. Ein Besuch auf der Website des technischen Supports schafft hier Abhilfe. Für Zeilenumbrüche und viele andere Befehle gibt es entsprechende Sprachkommandos. Wenn man das Programm per Post bestellt und nicht als Download, ist sogar eine Übersicht mit den wichtigsten Befehlen dabei – so wie auch ein Headset, das für meine Zwecke völlig ausreichend ist. Die Hotline ist im Übrigen auch super.

Gibt es Nachteile?

Wenn ich einen Tag lang gedolmetscht habe, habe ich danach manchmal keine Lust mehr, mit meinem Computer auch noch zu sprechen. Dann arbeite ich auf herkömmliche Art.

Wenn man in unterschiedlichen Sprachen arbeitet, muss man für jede Sprache ein neues Profil anlegen und zwischen diesen Profilen wechseln. Je nach Sprachenvielfalt in der Kombination könnte das lästig werden.


Mein Fazit: Das hört sich alles wirklich sehr vielversprechend an. Das größte Problem für uns Dolmetscher scheint – ähnlich wie bei der Generierung von Audiodateien, also dem umgekehrten Weg – das Hin und Her zwischen den Sprachen zu sein. Wenn jemand von Euch dazu Tipps und Erfahrungen hat, freue ich mich sehr über Kommentare – vielleicht wird es ja doch noch was mit der Terminologieextraktion per Stimme!

Über die Autorin:
Anja Rütten ist freiberufliche Konferenzdolmetscherin für Deutsch (A), Spanisch (B), Englisch (C) und Französisch (C) in Düsseldorf. Sie widmet sich seit Mitte der 1990er dem Wissensmanagement.

+++ English version +++

The other day, when I was talking to my GP and saw him dictate his thoughts to his computer instead of typing them in, I suddenly wondered why I was not using such a tool myself when preparing for an interpreting assignment? So I asked him about the system and, back home, went to try it myself straight away. Although what I was planning to do was not to buy the high-end dictation program Dragon Naturally Speaking I had been recommended, but instead to go for the built-in Windows speech recognition function and the equally built-in microphone of my laptop computer (bad idea) … The speech recognition module under Windows 10 was activated in no time (got to the Start menu, select „Ease of Access > Speech Recognition„) and off I went.

When the voice recognition function is first started, it takes you through a short learning routine in order to familiarise itself with your voice. After that, my Windows built-in dictation device was ready. For a start, I tried it in Microsoft Word. I found the first results rather impressive, but when it came to „Desoxyribonukleinsäure“ (deoxyribonucleic acid), I was completely disillusioned. See for yourselves the results of my first voice recognition test with some of the usual expressions from the daily life of any conference interpreter:

– 12345
– Automobilzulieferer
– Besserungszeremonien Kline sollte es auch viel wie Wohnen Nucleinsäuren für das (Desoxyribonukleinsäure)
– Beste Rock Siri Wohnung Klee ihnen sollte noch in Welle (Desoxyribonukleinsäure)
– Verlustvortrag
– Rechnungsabgrenzungsposten
– Vorrats Datenspeicherung
– Noch Händewellenlänge (Nockenwelle)
– Keilriemen
– Brennstoffzellen Fahrzeuge

Not bad for a start – but not quite the miracle of voice recognition I would need in order to live this dream of dictating terminology into a list on my computer while reading documents to prepare for an interpreting assignment. Something decent was what I needed, probably a decent microphone, for a start.

So I enquired about the famous dictation software Dragon Naturally Speaking, chatted with one of the support people and checked the options. For 99 EUR, Dragon’s Home Edition only supports one language. The Premium Edition for 169 EUR supports one selected language plus English (If you choose English when buying the software, it is English-only.)  If I want German, Spanish, English and possibly also my second C-language, French, it gets both complicated and expensive. So I discarded the whole idea until, only a few days later, our dear colleague Fee Engemann happened to mention to me – in a completely different context – that she actually worked with Dragon! I was all ears and spontaneously asked her if she would like to share some of her experience with us in an interview. Luckily, she accepted!


Interview with Fee Engemann February 19th, 2016

What is the voice recognition quality of Dragon Naturally Speaking like?

Surprisingly good. The program familiarises itself with your voice and speech patterns, and you can also „teach“ it new words, or let it read loads of new words from entire files. You can also spell words in case the system does not understand you at all.

What do you use Dragon for?

I use it as an OCR substitute when I get a text to translate which is not machine-readable. The big advantage is that once you have done that, you know the entire text.

When preparing for an interpreting assignment, I dictate my terminology into a list and add the equivalent terms in the other language once I have finished reading the texts. That works in MS-Word and MS-Excel. If there are problems, this may be due to the compatibility module for a certain program being deactivated. The technical support website can help in this case. There are special commands for line breaks and the like. And if you order the software on a CD (instead of simply downloading it), your parcel will not only include a list with the most important commands, but also a headset, which is absolutely sufficient for my purpose. And by the way … the hotline is great, too.

Are there any downsides?

After a whole day of interpreting, I sometimes don’t feel like talking to my computer. In this case, I simply work the traditional way.

When working with several languages, you must create one profile per language and switch between them when switching languages. This may be quite cumbersome if you work with many different languages.


My personal conclusion is that this all sounds very promising. As always, our problem as conference interpreters with these technologies (just like when creating multilingual audio files, i.e. the other way around) seems to be the constant changing back and forth between languages. If any of my readers has experience or good advice to share, I will be happy to read about it in the comments – maybe voice-based term extraction is not that far away after all!

————————–

About the author:
Anja Rütten is a freelance conference interpreter for German (A), Spanish (B), English (C) and French (C) based in Düsseldorf, Germany. She has specialised in knowledge management since the mid-1990s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GetSEMPER.com – Charmant-penetranter Vokabeltrainer | Persistant, though charming: your personal vocab trainer

„Aktivierung von Schlüsselterminologie“, „Memor(is)ierung“ oder „Vokabelpauken“ – egal, wie man es nennt: Eine gewisse Basisausrüstung an Fachterminologie muss einfach ins Hirn. Hierzu kann man sich Listen ausdrucken, Karteikarten schreiben oder eine Reihe von Apps und Programmen nutzen (Anki, Phase 6, Langenscheidt und Pons wurden mir bei einer Spontanumfrage unter Kollegen genannt, auch die InterpretBank bietet ein Lernmodul), die sich aber bei mir in der Praxis nicht durchgesetzt haben, weil ich mich damit einigermaßen vorsätzlich hinsetzen und lernen müsste … puuhhh. Da lasse ich mich schon lieber von einem sprechenden Glossar berieseln und hoffe, dass das Gehörte irgendwie hängenbleibt.

Umso wachsamer wurde ich, als in verschiedenen Zeitschriften und Blogs Semper empfohlen wurde, eine Lern-App, die ganz proaktiv und aufdringlich jedes Mal, wenn man sein Handy aktiviert,  eine Lernfrage stellt. Ganz im Sinne des Microlearning, denn kleine Lerneinheiten in wechselnden Situationen funktionieren ja sehr viel besser als stundenlanges Pauken an einem Ort. Ruckzuck hatte ich die App installiert und nach kurzem Stöbern in den verfügbaren „Packs“ (virtuelle Karteikartenstapel; ich setze sie immer in Anführungsstriche, damit niemand denkt, ich rede von einer Art Gesocks) war klar: Das mach ich mal besser selbst. Dazu musste ich mich im Browser bei www.getsemper.com anmelden (wenn man ein Google-Konto hat, am besten damit) und hattte nach wenigen Klicks ein eigenes Pack erschaffen.

GetSemper CreatePack1

Und um dieses dann mit Inhalt zu füllen, wurde ich zu meinem großen Erstaunen zu einer GoogleSheets-Tabelle weitergeleitet, denn nichts anderes ist ein solches „Pack“ – der PackCreator von Semper ist schlichtweg ein Add-On. Sehr praktisch, wo doch Gemeinschaftsglossare in der Cloud ohnehin gerade in Mode ist.

GetSemper PackCreator Waste EN-DE

Jedenfalls kopiert man einfach seine zu lernenden Wortliste aus jeder x-beliebigen Tabelle in die entsprechenden Spalten, klickt auf „Publish“ und schon wird das „Pack“ an das eigene Handy geschickt und erscheint in der Semper-App – und man findet die Datei zudem in der eigenen Google-Ablage unter „zuletzt verwendet“ und kann so ziemlich einfach darauf zugreifen, wenn man etwas ändern oder die wichtigsten Termini für den nächsten Auftrag hineinpacken möchte.

So habe ich mir mal flott ein „Pack“ mit meinen „Darüber-muss-ich-immer-zu-lange-nachdenken“-Termini Deutsch-Spanisch erstellt und, weil es so viel Spaß machte, gleich noch eins in Englisch-Deutsch aus der EU-Abfallstatistiknomenklatur (Verordnung 2150/2002). Und nun werde ich beharrlich bei jedem Aktivieren des Handybildschirms nach Müllsorten, Chemikalien oder Insekten in meinen verschiedenen Arbeitssprachen gefragt.

Mir persönlich gefällt dabei der Karteikartenmodus („Flashcard“) besser als der Multiple-Choice-Modus, aber das ist sicher Geschmackssache.

GetSemper Android 2016_01_28_11.44.54

Herzallerliebst ist übrigens auch die Audioausgabe, wenn man sich die Elemente seiner Vokabelliste einzeln ansieht und dabei auf das Lautsprechersymbol klickt.

GetSemper Android Options

Man kann wählen, ob man nur beim Entsperren des Smartphone-Bildschirms („Lockscreen“) abgefragt wird oder auch dann, wenn man bestimmte Apps öffnet („Loadscreen“). Mein Selbstversuch dauert bislang ca. 48 Stunden an, aber schon nach 10 Minuten konnte ich sagen, dass mich die Loadscreen-Funktion zuverlässig in den Wahnsinn treiben würde. Über die Abfrage beim LockScreen freue ich mich hingegen auch nach 48 Stunden noch wie eine Schneekönigin, zumal die Handhabung sehr geschmeidig ist. Wir sprechen uns dann in einem Monat noch einmal …

PS: Sehr schöne Studie zum Thema Microlearning am Handy: Lindemann, Oliver et al.. (2013). Learning Effects of Arithmetic Problem Solving while Unlocking a Mobile Phone. Zenodo. 10.5281/zenodo.18094

————————
Über die Autorin:
Anja Rütten ist freiberufliche Konferenzdolmetscherin für Deutsch (A), Spanisch (B), Englisch (C) und Französisch (C) in Düsseldorf. Sie widmet sich seit Mitte der 1990er dem Wissensmanagement.

+++ English version +++

„Activation of key terminology“, „memorising“ or „vocab learning“ – no matter what you call it, the fundamentals of terminology just need to be there in your brain (and not only on paper/hard disk). You can print lists or make flashcards or use one of those many apps and programs to learn your words (Anki, Phase 6, Langenscheidt and Pons was what colleagues mentioned spontaneously, InterpretBank also has a learning module), but none of these have made their way into my daily routine as an interpreter so far, basically because I couldn’t be bothered to sit down and study my vocab … I would rather listen to one of my talking glossaries and hope that the words would somehow find their way into my memory.

So I was all the more intrigued by a learning app that I read about some time ago in several magazines and blogs: Semper is a proactive and pushy little fellow who asks you impertinent vocab questions each time you unblock your smartphone screen. Real microlearning, actually: tiny memorising units dispersed over the day in changing contexts are much more effective than long learning sessions at one place. I quite liked the idea and installed Semper on my Android phone straightaway. After searching the vast amount of available „packs“ (virtual  stacks or decks of flashcards), it was clear to me that I wanted my own pack, so I opened my desktop browser and logged on at www.getsemper.com (preferably do this with your Google account if you have one) and a few clicks later I had created my first pack.

GetSemper CreatePack1

In order to fill this pack with life (i.e. weird words to learn), to my great surprise I was brought to a quite familiar place: GoogleSheets. A Semper „pack“ is just that: A Google sheet with an add-on called PackCreator –which comes in quite handy, with shared Google glossaries becoming rather fashionable these days.

GetSemper PackCreator Waste EN-DE

So all I had to do was copy & paste a word list from my own database into the columns, click „publish“ and off it went. A few minutes or even seconds later my brand new pack arrived in the Semper app on my mobile phone. And I can also still find it in my personal GoogleDrive (under „recent“), which makes it very easy to modify and put in the latest vocab for the next job.

I enjoyed myself so much that I not only created one Spanish-German pack with all those words that always take me just a second too long to recall but also an English-German one containing the EU waste nomenclature (taken from regulation 2150/2002). And now each time I unlock the screen of my phone  I will be tested infallibly on waste categories, chemicals or weird insects in one of my working languages.

As to the testing mode, I personally prefer the „Flashcard“ mode from the „Multiple Choice“ one, but I suppose that’s a matter of personal preference.

GetSemper Android 2016_01_28_11.44.54

If you open your pack and look at the elements in detail, you will even find a very charming audio output feature (click on the speaker symbol).

GetSemper Android Options

You can also choose if you only wish to be tested when unlocking your screen („Lockscreen“) or also when you open certain apps („Loadscreen“). My self-experiment has been on for about 48 hours now, and although it only took me 10 minutes to find out that the loadscreen function would drive me completely insane, I am still delighted to answer Semper’s questions each time I unlock my phone. We’ll speak again in a month …

PS: Worth reading: Lindemann, Oliver et al.. (2013). Learning Effects of Arithmetic Problem Solving while Unlocking a Mobile Phone. Zenodo. 10.5281/zenodo.18094

————————–
About the author:
Anja Rütten is a freelance conference interpreter for German (A), Spanish (B), English (C) and French (C) based in Düsseldorf, Germany. She has specialised in knowledge management since the mid-1990s.

 

 

How to build one nice multilingual file from several PDFs | Aus zwei (PDFs) mach eins – übersichtliche mehrsprachige PDFs erstellen | Cómo crear un archivo PDF multilingüe

+++ for English see below +++ para español, aun más abajo +++

Wir kennen ihn alle: Den über hundert Seiten langen Geschäftsbericht, vollgepackt mit Grafiken, Tabellen und wertvollen Informationen, und das – Halleluja! – nicht nur im Original, sondern auch noch in 1a-Übersetzung(en) . Einen besseren Fundus für die Dolmetschvorbereitung kann man sich kaum vorstellen. Nur: Wie bändige und berge ich diesen Schatz? In zwei Excel-Tabellenspalten kopieren? Funktioniert mit solchen Mammut-Dokumenten nur mäßig. Alignieren? Viel Erfolg, mit einem pdf-Dokument … Ausdrucken und nebeneinanderlegen? In einer handelsüblichen Kabine eher beschwerlich. So erlebt zuletzt im vergangenen Sommer, als dann Ignacio Hermo schließlich die Wunderwaffe im Internet zutage gefördert hat: A-PDF N-up Page, ein Programm, das mehrere pdf-Dokumente nicht nur einfach zusammenführt (also alle hintereinanderklatscht), sondern auch die entsprechenden Seiten ordentlich nebeneinanderstellt. Das Ergebnis eignet sich dann hervorragend zum Parallel-Lesen und als Nachschlagewerk.

Eventuell muss man nach der Installation einmalig unter Option/Settings/Page Range „merge all PDF files to one …“ aktivieren. Danach ist die Bedienung denkbar einfach: Man wählt oben die beiden Dateien aus und klickt unten auf „N-up Page …“.

N-Up_1 small

Als Ergebnis erhält man ein pdf, in dem die beiden Sprachen hübsch ordentlich nebeneinander erscheinen:

PDF merged English Spanish

Und natürlich funktioniert das auch mit Powerpoints und anderen Formaten, wenn man sie vorher in pdf konvertiert.

Möchte man nun womöglich mehr als zwei Sprachen nebeneinander sehen (wobei man dann bei der Lesbarkeit an die Grenzen handelsüblicher Bildschirme stößt), so fügt man immer zwei Sprachen in eine Datei zusammen und diese beiden zweisprachigen Dateien (oder auch eine einsprachige plus eine zweisprachige Datei) verschmelzt man dann wiederum in einem zweiten Schritt zu einer drei- bzw. viersprachigen.

N-Up four filesN-Up three files

 

 

 

 

 

Das Ergebnis sieht dann mit drei Sprachen so aus (für deutlichere Darstellung Grafik anklicken):

DE EN ES merged

… und bei vier Sprachen so:

PDF merged EN DE ES FR

Zwar gibt es auch einen so genannten „4-Up“-Modus, dieser legt aber dann die vier Sprachen nicht alle nebeneinander. Man muss dazu wissen, dass das Programm eigentlich dazu gedacht ist, die Seiten eines pdf-Dokuments für den Buchdruck passend anzuordnen. An Dolmetscher hat bei der Entwicklung eher niemand gedacht.

————————-
Über die Autorin:
Anja Rütten ist freiberufliche Konferenzdolmetscherin für Deutsch (A), Spanisch (B), Englisch (C) und Französisch (C) in Düsseldorf. Sie widmet sich seit Mitte der 1990er dem Wissensmanagement.

+++ English version +++

We all know those huge annual reports, over a hundred pages full of charts, tables and valuable information, and, would you believe it, not only in the original language, but also translated (and excellently so) into the other relevant language(s). You couldn’t possibly think of any better source of information in order to prepare for your interpreting assignment. But how to best exploit this abundance of information? Copy everything into two columns of a spreadsheet? Hardly ever works with such massive documents. Align them in a translation memory program? Good luck then, as PDF files don’t actually have a track record of aligning easily. Print everything and spread it out in the booth? Maybe not, at least not if your booth is less than XXL.

When I last encountered this problem back in June, my team mate Ignacio Hermo went through the trouble of searching the internet for the magic solution, and finally found it – A-PDF N-up Page, a program that not only merges several PDF documents into one (simply putting them one behind the other), but also puts the corresponding pages of the different language versions neatly next to each other. The result perfectly serves our purpose of reading the different languages in parallel and of using this multilingual text corpus as a tailor-made encyclopaedia for this particular conference.

After installation, you may have to go to Option/Settings/Page Range once and activate „merge all PDF files to one …“. After that, the tool is really easy to handle: just select your files using the „add file“ button and then click on the „N-up Page …“ button below.

N-Up_1 small

The result is a PDF doc where the two language versions appear nicely next to each other:

PDF merged English Spanish

And obviously, this also works with any Powerpoint presentation and other file formats, as long as you convert them into PDFs before merging them.

If you are crazy enough to consider viewing more than two language versions at a time (the only limit is the screen, obviously) then simply merge two and two and then again merge the two bilingual files (or one bilingual and one monolingual).

N-Up four filesN-Up three files

 

 

 

 

 

This is what the trilingual result looks like (click on the picture to see it clearly) …

DE EN ES merged

… and here’s the quadrilingual file:

PDF merged EN DE ES FR

The tool also has a so-called „4-Up“ mode, but this does not put each page in four languages together. No surprise, though, considering that this program was originally made to arrange the pages of an ordinary pdf file in such a way that it can be printed as a book. No one had us conference interpreters in mind then.

————————–
About the author:
Anja Rütten is a freelance conference interpreter for German (A), Spanish (B), English (C) and French (C) based in Düsseldorf, Germany. She has specialised in knowledge management since the mid-1990s.

+++ Versión española +++

Todos las conocemos, estas enormes memorias anuales de más de cien páginas, repletas de gráficos, tablas y un montón de información super útil, y todo eso incluso viene perfectamente traducido a todos los idiomas de la conferencia o la empresa. Increíble, ¿verdad? El único problema con el que nos encontramos ahora es el de saber cómo manejar esta inmensa cantidad de información valiosa, tanto en cabina como a la hora de prepararnos para la conferencia. Copiar y pegarlo todo en dos (o más) columnas de una tabla Excel a duras penas nos funcionaría, con tantos gráficos, tablas y demás cosas. Tampoco serviría de mucho alinearlo en una memoria de traducción, dado que los pdfs no tienen fama de alinearse bien.  Entonces imprimirlo todo y colocarlo sobre la mesa en cabina? Pues no, a no ser que la cabina sea de tamaño XXL.

La última vez que me encontré con este problema, este verano, nuestro querido compañero Ignacio Hermo se puso a buscar la herramienta mágica en internet, y – ¿como ven? – la encontró: A-PDF N-up Page, un programa que no sólo combina varios documentos tipo pdf en uno (colocándolos uno tras otro) sino que los ordena de tal forma que las páginas en los diferentes idiomas aparecen una al lado de la otra. Queda bien bonito y nos sirve perfectamente para leer en varios idiomas en paralelo y consultar este enorme corpus de texto como enciclopedia específica de esta conferencia en particular.

Después de haber instalado el programa, puede ser que tenga que ir a Option/Settings/Page Range una vez y activar „merge all PDF files to one …“. Después resulta facilísimo usar esta herramienta: Simplemente se seleccionan los archivos usando el botón „Add File“ de arriba y se pincha en el botón „N-up Page …“ de abajo – y ya se arma el archivo multilingüe.

N-Up_1 small

El resultado es un documento tipo pdf en donde aparecen las dos versiones lingüísticas una al lado de la otra:

PDF merged English Spanish

Evidentemente, esto también funciona con presentaciones tipo Powerpoint o cualquier otro formato mientras se convierta en pdf primero.

Y si se les ocurre visualizar más de dos idiomas a la vez (el único límite es el formato de la pantalla), simplemente tienen que combinar siempre dos con dos y luego, en un segundo paso, volver a unir los dos archivos bilingües (o uno bilingüe con uno monolingüe).

N-Up four filesN-Up three files

 

 

 

 

 

Así se ve el resultado trilingüe (para verlo más claro, hay que hacer clic en la imagen): 

DE EN ES merged

… y este es el archivo cuatrilingüe:

PDF merged EN DE ES FR

El programa también tiene una función llamada „4-Up“, pero ésta no coloca las páginas de tal manera que las diferentes versiones lingüísticas de una misma página aparezcan juntas. No es de sorprender, considerando que la idea del tool era la de reorganizar las páginas de un pdf normal como para poder imprimirlo como libro. Al programarlo, nadie tenía en mente las necesidades de los intérpretes de conferencias.

————————–

La autora:
Anja Rütten es intérprete de conferencias autónoma para alemán (A), español (B), inglés y francés (C), domiciliada en Düsseldorf/Alemania. Se dedica al tema de la gestión de los conocimientos desde mediados de los años 1990.

Digital dementia and conference interpreters – article published in Multilingual July/August 2015

DigitalDementiaMultilingual Preview

To read this article on effects of digitalisation on conference interpreters‘ memory and learning habits, please follow the link to multilingual.com (English only).

 

—————-

About the author
Anja Rütten is a freelance conference interpreter for German (A), Spanish (B), English (C) and French (C) based in Düsseldorf, Germany. She has specialised in knowledge management since the mid-1990s.

 

 

Summary table of terminology tools for interpreters | Übersichtstabelle Terminologietools für Dolmetscher | cuadro sinóptico de programas de gestión de terminología para intérpretes

This is an overview of all the terminology management tools for conference interpreters that I am aware of. I will try to keep the information in the table up to date. If there is anything wrong, feel free to post a comment!

Dies ist eine Übersicht über alle Terminologieverwaltungstools für Konferenzdolmetscher, die mir bekannt sind. Ich versuche, die Informationen immer auf dem neuesten Stand zu halten. Wenn mir etwas entgangen ist, freue ich mich über eine Kommentar.

Esta lista contiene todos los programas de gestión de terminología para intérpretes de conferencias que conozco. Intentaré mantener esta tabla actualizada. Si encuentran algún error o si falta algo, no duden en publicar un comentario.

Program by runs on price blog article
Flashterm.eu Eisenrieth Dokumentations GmbH Windows, Mac, iOS and browser-based Solo edition currently free of charge (anniversary promotion), additional interpreter module for 299 EUR market snapshot part 3
Glossarmanager Glossarmanager GbR/Frank Brempe, Bonn Windows free of charge
Glossary Assistant Reg Martin, Switzerland tablets running Android 4.1 or later, phones running Android 4.2 or later, Windows based PC free of charge market snapshot part 2;

Interview with Reg Martin on LangFM

Interplex Peter Sand, Eric Hartner, Geneva Windows, iOS full license 99€, student license 49€, university license free upon agreement; free demo; Interplex HD for ipad 19,99 $, Interplex lite for iphone (viewer) free market snapshot part 1
InterpretBank Claudio Fantinuoli, Germersheim Windows, Mac (using Crossover); Android search app (will not be further developed) free demo; full license: 79 €, student license: 49 €, free demo license for university teachers (and their students), free Android version market snapshot part 1
Interpreters’ Help Benoît Werner and Yann Plancqueel, Berlin, Paris all (browser-based), additionally Boothmate for Mac OS X and ipad free public glossaries + one private glossary;  pro version 19.99 €/month; free education plans market snapshot part 2;

Review by Alex Drechsel

http://www.adrechsel.de/langfm/interpretershelp

Intragloss Dan Kenig and Daniel Pohoryles, Paris Mac; Windows-version expected to be released in 2016 Special offer valid until Dec. 31, 2015: 39 $ for the first 6 months, 69 $ for first year; renewal 219 $/1 year, 309 $/2 years, 359 $/3 years (regular price: 49 $/month, 99 $/3 months, 269 $/1 year) Intragloss – the missing link;

Interview with Dan Kenig on LangFM

Lookup Christoph Stoll, Heidelberg Windows free of charge market snapshot part 1
Terminus Nils Wintringham, Zürich Windows (for W8, don’t use the default installation folder) CHF 148 plus VAT, 50 % off for academia, free demo with limited number of entries  market snapshot part 1

Generic database or spreadsheet programs:

Program by runs on price blog article
Excel Microsoft Windows, Mac e.g. Office 395 Personal 69.99 € per year including Access (for 1 PC/Mac plus 1 tablet) Excel and Access – any good for the booth?
Access Microsoft Windows, Mac, Android, iOS e.g. Office Home and Student 139.00 € (once for 1 PC) or Office 395 Personal 69.99 € per year including Access (for 1 PC plus 1 tablets) Excel and Access – any good for the booth?
LibreOffice Base The Document Foundation Windows, Linux, Mac OS X; Viewer for Android free of charge
LibreOffice Calc The Document Foundation Windows, Linux, Mac OS X; Viewer for Android free of charge
Filemaker FileMaker, Inc., (Apple Inc. subsidiary) Windows, Mac, iOS 329.00 $
Google Sheets Google all (browser-based) free of charge  Shared Glossaries in Google Docs
TapForms Tap Zapp Software Inc.; Calgary, Canada Mac und iOS Mac 34.99 $, ipad 9.,99 $, iphone 8.99 $ Phil Demay I-interprètes (in French)

Screencast by Alex Drechsel

Airtable Airtable, San Francisco all (browser-based); App for iOS and Android (beta) up to 1500 lines per database free of charge, up to 5000 for 12 $/month, up to 50 000 für 24 $/month Airtable – a great Google Sheets replacement

www.termtools.dolmetscher-wissen-alles.de
© Anja Rütten

Handschriftlich notieren oder tippen – was sagt die Forschung? | Handwriting vs. typing – what does research tell us?

+++ for English see below +++

laptop Egal, in welchem Kreis von Dolmetschern man darüber redet, geschätzte 10 % schwören immer Stein und Bein, dass sie sich die Dinge besser merken können, wenn sie sie mit Stift und Papier festhalten. Sie pfeifen auch auf die Vorteile des papierlosen Büros, darauf, ihre Unterlagen durchsuchen und Glossare sortieren zu können, mit Kollegen Unterlagen auszutauschen oder einfach nur kein Papier zu verschwenden und immer alles digital verfügbar zu haben. Die Argumentation lautet für gewöhnlich in etwa so: „Die Wörter wandern dann durch den Stift den Arm hinauf und direknotizent in mein Gehirn.“ In meinen Ohren eine etwas grobe Herleitung … Umgekehrt begegne ich allerdings auch der eher zufällig gemachten Erkenntnis mit Misstrauen, dass ich beim Konsekutivdolmetschen mit der Tastatur um ein Vielfaches detaillierter notiere als mit Stift und Block … Aber deshalb die hohe Kunst der Notizentechnik über Bord werfen? Meine Notizentechnik war zu Beginn meiner Karriere mein ganzer Stolz, ausgefeilt und systematisch. Mittlerweile ähnelt sie zwar eher einem Stück Papier, das man versehentlich im Hühnerstall vergessen hat – dies könnte mir aber egaler nicht sein, denn meine Merkfähigkeit im Konsekutivdolmetschen entwickelt sich glücklicherweise umgekehrt proportional zur Lesbarkeit und Schönheit meiner Notizen. Eigentlich einleuchtend: Die Notizentechnik ist darauf angelegt, Sinnstrukturen abzubilden, und abbilden bedeutet zunächst einmal erkennen. Je mehr man das Erkennen von Sinnstrukturen trainiert, desto überflüssiger macht sich die Notizentechnik entsprechend selbst. Also bin ich nach wie vor ein großer Fan von handschriftlichen Notizen beim Konsekutivdolmetschen, weil es einfach das Mitdenken und Verstehen fördert und die lebendige und glaubhafte Verdolmetschung einer Rede und keine Wort-für-Wort-Übersetzung vom Notizblatt ermöglicht. So weit, so gut. Aber muss ich deshalb wirklich auch alles andere handschriftlich festhalten, damit mein Geist sich bequemt, die Information in Wissen umzuwandeln?

Zu meiner großen Begeisterung hat sich kürzlich ein Forscherteam in den USA (Pam A. Mueller von der Princeton University und Daniel M. Oppenheimer von der University of California, Los Angeles) genau diese Frage gestellt: Hat das Notier-Instrument (Stift vs. Tastatur) einen Einfluss auf das Lernen? Dabei kamen ein paar interessante Erkenntnisse zutage:

Studenten, die bei einer Vorlesung mit Papier und Stift Notizen gemacht hatten, erzielten nachher beim Beantworten konzeptioneller Fragen zu Sinnzusammenhängen besser Ergebnisse als die Testpersonen, die mit dem Laptop notiert hatten. Ein Vorteil des Tippens liegt grundsätzlich zwar darin, dass man mengenmäßig mehr Informationen festhalten kann, was grundsätzlich dem Lernen zuträglich ist. Ein großer Nachteil – der diesen Vorteil zunichte machen kann – besteht jedoch darin, dass man beim Tippen eher dazu neigt, wortwörtlich mitzuschreiben, statt Sachverhalte zu synthetisieren (selbst wenn im Versuch darum gebeten wird, dies nicht zu tun). Dies wiederum beeinträchtigt die Verarbeitungstiefe und das inhaltliche Lernen. Was für konzeptionelles Wissen gilt, gilt jedoch nicht zwingend für andere Wissensarten: Beim Abfragen von Faktenwissen war es in den Versuchen interessanterweise so, dass die „Stiftnotierer“ den „Tastaturnotierern“ nur dann überlegen waren, wenn zwischen dem Notieren und dem Beantworten der Fragen eine Woche Zeit vergangen war; beim Abfragen unmittelbar nach dem Notieren waren hier die Leistungen gleich.

Als Konferenzdolmetscherin geht mir bei dieser Studie das Herz auf. Nicht ohne einen flüchtigen Gedanken an unser aller Lieblings-Kundenausspruch („Sie sollen das nicht verstehen, Sie sollen das nur dolmetschen.“) kommt mir sofort die wunderbare Kunst der Notizentechnik in den Sinn. Wenn schon das handschriftliche und damit zusammenfassende Notieren von Inhalten dem wortwörtlichen Mittippen überlegen ist, wie spitzemmäßig muss das Aufnehmen von Inhalten dann erst mit der Dolmetsch-Notizentechnik funktionieren, die ja genau das Abbilden von Sinnzusammenhängen zum Gegenstand hat? Wäre es nicht interessant, diese Versuche mit Dolmetschern zu wiederholen? Müsste nicht eigentlich die ganze Welt unsere Notizentechnik lernen?

Andererseits bin ich als papierlose Dolmetscherin auch beruhigt, dass das reine Faktenwissen ebensogut tastaturbasiert verarbeitet werden kann. Sprich: Wenn ich mir – oder Kollegen – beim Dolmetschen (sei es simultan oder konsekutiv) ohnehin nur ein paar Zahlen,  Namen oder Termini notiere, weil ich den Rest aus dem Kopf mache, kann ich das auch gleich am PC machen. Wenn es aber um „richtiges“ Konsekutivdolmetschen geht, sind Stift und Block (oder Touchscreen) plus gute Notizentechnik die Methode der Wahl. Aber auch in der Vorbereitungsphase – wenn es um Zusammenhänge geht, um Abläufe oder Unternehmensstrukturen – ist es durchaus eine gute Idee, sich dies mit Stift und Papier buchstäblich vor Augen zu führen – am besten auch dann unter Verwendung der Notizentechnik, frei nach Matyssek or Rozan.

PS: Und wer noch darüber nachdenkt, wie man diese Spontanvisualisierungen dann am geschicktesten in den Computer bekommt: Vielleicht taugt ja das neue Mikrowellen-Notizbuch etwas?

————————-
Über die Autorin:
Anja Rütten ist freiberufliche Konferenzdolmetscherin für Deutsch (A), Spanisch (B), Englisch (C) und Französisch (C) in Düsseldorf. Sie widment sich seit Mitte der 1990er dem Wissensmanagement.

+++ English version +++

Whenever you get tlaptopo talk about note-taking with a bunch of conference interpreters, at least one in ten will most probably be telling you that they just remember things better if they write them down using pen and paper. They don’t care about paperless offices, searching their documents and sorting glossaries alphabetically, sharing information with colleagues or simply avoiding excessive use of paper and having access to their documents any place, any time. The explanation goes roughly like this: “The words just travel through the pen up my arm, entering directly into my brain.” notizenSlightly too simple a reasoning to convince me … On the other hand, I am nonetheless suspicious about a phenomenon I found out about rather by coincidence: interpreting consecutively, I can take many more notes, and more detailed ones, using my laptop computer than with pen and paper. Fair enough … but reason enough to scrap my good old-fashioned note-taking technique, which I was so proud of back when I graduated? Once very nuanced and systematic, nowadays my notes rather resemble a piece of paper someone forgot in the hen house. But I couldn’t care less, as my powers of memory seem to increase in inverse proportion to the beauty and legibility of my notes. Quite logical, actually: Interpreters’ note-taking technique is made to visualise semantic structures, and visualising means understanding in the first place. So the more you practice note-taking, the less you will end up needing them, which is why I am still quite fond of pen and paper notes after all. What we want to deliver is the lively and credible interpretation of a speech and not a sight translation of our notes. Now that’s for interpreting. But do I really have to write down every piece of information with pen and paper for my mind to take it in as knowledge?

To my utmost delight, a team of researchers in the USA (Pam A. Mueller from Princeton University and Daniel M. Oppenheimer from University of California, Los Angeles) have asked themselves exactly the same question: Does the instrument of note-taking (pen vs. keyboard) influence learning? The results are quite interesting:

Students who had taken notes of a lecture using pen and paper performed better in answering conceptual questions than those tested who had taken notes using a laptop computer. Even though typing has the advantage that more information can be captured, which in itself is beneficial to learning, the downside – potentially outweighing this advantage – is that when fast-typing, people tend to transcribe verbatim instead of synthesing the content (and the test participants did so even when being told to avoid verbatim transcription). This in turn leads to shallower processing and impairs conceptual learning. But, interestingly, what goes for conceptual learning, does not necessarily apply to other types of knowledge: For factual knowledge, the advantage pen-users showed over keyboard-users did only occur when a week had elapsed between the lecture and the test. In immediate testing, there was no difference in performance of pen vs. keyboard users.

As a conference interpreter, I am quite thrilled by this study. It is not without remembering the famous client’s comment (“You are supposed to translate, not to understand.”) that our wonderful note-taking technique springs to mind. If hand-written, i. e. summarising, content-based notes are superior to verbatim typing, then just how much more efficient must interpreters’ notes be, which are designed to do exactly this, encoding conceptual relations? Wouldn’t it be interesting to repeat the same study with interpreters? And, by the way, shouldn’t the whole world learn how to take notes like interpreters do?

Then again, as a paperless interpreter I am in a way reassured to know that mere factual knowledge is eligible for keyboard-based processing after all. So I can still use my laptop computer while interpreting (simultaneously or consecutively) in order to note down some numbers, names or terms – be it for myself or for my colleague – while I rely on my brain for the rest of the job. But for “real” consecutive interpreting, pen and paper (or touchscreen) plus strong note-taking skills are the method of choice. And also in the preparation phase, when it comes to understanding the structure of a company or a particular workflow, there is no such thing as visualising them manually – ideally doing it the Matyssek or Rozan way.

PS: And if you are wondering how to bring the results of your spontaneous visualisations to your hard disc … What about the new microwaveable notebook?

————————–
About the author:
Anja Rütten is a freelance conference interpreter for German (A), Spanish (B), English (C) and French (C) based in Düsseldorf, Germany. She has specialised in knowledge management since the mid-1990s.

—————
Reference:
Pam A. Mueller1 and Daniel M. Oppenheimer2 (1Princeton University and 2University of California, Los Angeles): The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard: Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note Taking. In: Psychological Science 2014, Vol. 25(6) 1159–1168; http://pss.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/04/22/0956797614524581

Booth-friendly terminology management – Flashterm.eu

Flashterm Suchergebnis

+++ for English see below +++

Wer – womöglich auch fürs Übersetzen – eigentlich lieber eine „richtige“ Terminologieverwaltung hätte, die obendrein aber noch kabinenfreundlich ist, der sollte einmal bei Flashterm von der Eisenrieth Dokumentations GmbH vorbeischauen. Flashterm basiert auf Filemaker und bietet die Klassiker der Eintragsmöglichkeiten wie Sachgebiete, Synonyme, Kontext usw. , aber auch das Anlegen von bis zu 10 persönlichen Merklisten, integrierte Wikipediaabfrage und vieles mehr. Die Abfrage ist sehr komfortabel (ignoriert natürlich Akzepte und dergleichen) und wird fürs Simultandolmetschen noch besser, wenn man das Interpreter-Modul dazukauft. Bei der Darstellung der Suchergebnisse werden (nebst Definition in der Ausgangssprache) die Benennungen in allen Zielsprachen angezeigt (zehn passen mindestens in die Anzeige). Insgesamt deutlich mehr als nur eine zweidimensionale Tabelle (auch „Glossar“ genannt). Funktioniert für 195 Sprachen – da müsste eigentlich für jeden was dabei sein!

– verfügbar für PC und Mac, ipad/iphone und browser-basiert
–  Solo-Edition derzeit kostenlos (Jubiläumsangebot)
– zusätzliches Interpreter-Modul für 299 EUR

Mehr zu dolmetschfreundlichen Terminologieprogrammen findet Ihr in den beiden Vorgängerbeiträgen:
Booth-friendly terminology management programs for interpreters – a market snapshot (LookUp, Interplex, InterpretBank)
Booth-friendly terminology management revisited – 2 newcomers (Interpreters‘ Help, Glossary Assistant)

—————–
Über die Autorin:
Anja Rütten ist freiberufliche Konferenzdolmetscherin für Deutsch (A), Spanisch (B), Englisch (C) und Französisch (C) in Düsseldorf. Sie widment sich seit Mitte der 1990er dem Wissensmanagement.

+++ English version +++

If what you are after is „real“ terminology management – e.g. because you double as a translator – but the program should still be booth-friendly, then you should definitely meet Flashterm by Eisenrieth Dokumentations GmbH. Flashterm is based on Filemaker and has the typical entry options like subject area, synonyms, context etc., but you can also create up to 10  personal memory lists, it has integrated Wikipedia query and much more. The query function is very handy (ignores accents and the like) and gets even better if you buy the supplementary „Interpreter“ module, wich offers an optimised search interface for the booth. Search results are displayed with the definition in the source language plus the equivalent terms in all your target languages (at least ten fit on the screen). All in all, this is much more than a two-dimensional table (aka „glossary“). It works with 195 languages, so I suppose it suits pretty much every taste.

– available for PC and Mac, ipad/iphone and browser-based
– Solo Edition free of charge at the moment (special anniversary promotion)
– supplementary „Interpreter“ module for 299 EUR

For more information about terminology management for interpreters, see previous articles on the subject:
Booth-friendly terminology management programs for interpreters – a market snapshot (LookUp, Interplex, InterpretBank)
Booth-friendly terminology management revisited – 2 newcomers (Interpreters‘ Help, Glossary Assistant)

——-
About the author:
Anja Rütten is a freelance conference interpreter for German (A), Spanish (B), English (C) and French (C) based in Düsseldorf, Germany. She has specialised in knowledge management since the mid-1990s.